ID-10049062As reported on Consumerreports.org there is both inorganic and organic (less toxic) arsenic found in rice. What we do to lower our families risk to be exposed inorganic arsenic is mixing up our diet. In many cultures such as in many Latin American cultures or Asian if you don’t have rice with your meal they feel they have not eaten a proper meal.  My father always says if he does eat a bowl of rice at dinner then this is not a real dinner…  If you use other grains like Organic Quinoa (non gmo and gluten-free) as a substitute or even vegetables like cauliflower shredded as a substitute you can still eat rice each week  a couple times and lower your families exposure by not offering it every day.

Consumerreports.org goes onto mention that “regular exposure to small amounts of arsenic can increase the risk of bladder, lung, and skin cancer” and then it mentions that there could be “effects on the baby’s immune system”.  So your probably freaking out as in most families rice is staple and fed regularly to the family in many different forms of dishes.  Consumerreports.org did some tests and found that inorganic arsenic levels varied by the type of rice and where it was grown.  They found that these types of rice had half the amount of inorganic arsenic then other types of rices: white basmati rice from California, India, Pakistan and sushi rice from the US.   The report also calls out that many other grains that have lower or negligible amounts inorganic arsenic in them such as amaranth, buckwheat, millet and grits.  Organic Quinoa (non gmo and gluten-free) one of our favorite grains was reported to have low levels of Arsenic.  The article goes onto mention that rinsing rice and using more water when cooking and then draining the rice will remove about 30% of the inorganic arsenic content.   Checkout the video below and read the full report on Consumerreports.org.

 

Jasmine Rice Bowl image courtesy of John Kasawa at FreeDigitalPhotos.net